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  • WOOD-What spray paint?

    Posted by John Singh on August 18, 2004 at 7:45 pm

    Hi Guys

    I’m getting a compressor and air gun soon and want to get some advice on correct paint.

    I’ve a framed board: The frame is of solid mahogany and the panel is of dibond.

    I want to spray the whole job. I have actually done jobs before where the customer has provided a sprayed mdf board and it look terrific as well of course very durable and tough.

    Should I be looking at Automotive paint or is there some other stuff?

    John

    John Singh replied 19 years, 9 months ago 8 Members · 24 Replies
  • 24 Replies
  • Richard Urquhart

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 8:01 pm

    hi mate i always use 2k primer then flat with 500 on the da and ready for 2k top coat
    2k products contain only a small amount of solvent and there for seal the mdf well ,celly primer keeps sucking in to the board and will matt the top coat
    i did a shop fit out and Had 48 8×4 sheets of the stuff the shop and board look great and thats some 2 years ago
    i run a car body shop so if you need any help with products give me a shout
    5:1 primer filler is the best i have found

  • Richard Urquhart

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 8:03 pm

    sorry just told you how to prep and paint m d f ๐Ÿ˜ณ still i use same method for all surfaces just key your surface well befor application

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 8:11 pm

    you trying to get rid of poor old John advicing him to use 2K, doubt wether he’s got an air fed mask and he’ll be doing it fully suited, John stay aawy from 2k they contain nasty isocyanates that will make you very DEAD!

  • Richard Urquhart

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 8:37 pm

    good point mate didnt think of that so used to painting in booth and using an airfed mask
    you could use i.c.i formula 1 which is nearly as good and non isocyanates

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 9:05 pm

    Thanks Dynamite………….

    and thanks Steve for allowing me to enjoy one more weekend before I snuff it :hung:

    Dynamite: Where do I get this I.C.I. Formula 1 stuff and………I take it that ordinary automotive spray will not work on wood?

    John

  • Richard Urquhart

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 9:11 pm

    i have an i.c.i paint system i can get you some prices tomorrow also i use 1k etch primer supplied in cans for steel , zinc coated,galv etc etc we call in break through primer this is good stuff the carpenter in my yard primes wood and says its good, celly paint is mixed 50:50and sinks in to wood , you can end up putting so many coats on and it still sinks i can send you some if you like i use loads wont miss a can or 2 it has brill adhesion properties call me tomorrow if you need anything
    rich 020 8655 1854

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 18, 2004 at 9:17 pm

    That I’ll do Rich

    Cheers ๐Ÿ˜€

    John

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    August 19, 2004 at 8:10 am

    ive never sprayed wood so cant coment ๐Ÿ˜•
    we have a booth and spray system. i use 2pac now and then and it is very sticky stuff.. what i mean is you need full paper boiler suit, goggles and resperator. ive seen me doing the odd job without goggles.. your eyebrowes get matted in over spray and around your eyes go the colour of the paint, its murder to wash off once dry.
    having said that, i only use my 3m resperator and hardly ever feel the need to use our airfed mask. obviously its important, but i think the 3m resperators are fine unless you are planning of spraying all day long.
    i generaly stick on a paper suit goggles and resperator for spraying sessions of upto about an hour 2… ๐Ÿ™„

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 19, 2004 at 8:15 am

    Hey its not every day i get to save someones life ๐Ÿ˜› remember this job I did John ?

    Well the letters are 18mm medite and I sprayed them with an exterior primer undercoat first then a coat of car high build primer then a couple of red base coats then a couple of coats of laquer and they look luverly and shiny and plasticky :lol1: oh and it still looks jolly nice too.

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 19, 2004 at 11:24 am

    I remember it well – a very nice job indeed

    Although I don’t seem to remember the method of treating the letters which sound extremely durable

    The system you mentioned seems to be what I’m after

    Where do you get the primer and other stuff from?

    Is it from the local automative paint supplies?

    John

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 19, 2004 at 4:37 pm
    quote Robert Lambie:

    but i think the 3m resperators are fine unless you are planning of spraying all day long.
    i generaly stick on a paper suit goggles and resperator for spraying sessions of upto about an hour 2… ๐Ÿ™„

    hey Rob if you are really doing this can I have your grenadier when you,re dead? you silly boy!!!!! ๐Ÿ™

    John the primer undercoat is Crowns stronghold and the other paint is from any old motor factor/paint supplier.

  • Terry Bull

    Member
    August 19, 2004 at 8:13 pm

    Not seen that before ..
    Thats a real nice looking sign there steve
    fits well with the overall look of the shop OK YA

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 20, 2004 at 2:24 pm

    Cheers Steve

    Interesting choice of Crowns stronghold – Its down as a masonary paint

    Is this right or am I off track?

    John

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 7:53 am

    John, Crown stronghold is a trade paint and there are various types in the Stronghold range, ave a butchers http://www.crowntrade.co.uk/

  • Bill Dewison

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 9:05 am

    I had a play with some medite about a fortnight ago, I was making some more chalkboards for a pub and thought I’d give it a pop. You could of warned me about all the dust ๐Ÿ˜ฅ ๐Ÿ˜ฅ ๐Ÿ˜‰ Took me about 2 hours to clean my vinyl rack of greeny dusty stuff, that’ll teach me to experiment! ๐Ÿ˜•

    Cheers, Dewi

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 10:14 am

    Err green??? ah if its a green tinged board mate thats Medite 313 moisture resistant not Medite Exterior, if it was sold to you as being Exterior then go back and give them a tw@ round the earhole with a big lump of 313 and get yer money back. Oh and wear a dust mask if you are cutting a lot as the dust is known to be carcinogenic ๐Ÿ˜ฎ sorry.

  • Bill Dewison

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 8:48 pm

    Carcinogenic? I thought that was the thing that made my engine run better on the car! ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ณ I’m not a big one for dust masks unfortunately, but considering the amount of cigarettes I smoke daily, I think my lungs take a bit of a battering as it is ๐Ÿ˜• I was warned by the woodyard about working in an enclosed environment ๐Ÿ™„ and I kind of picked it up at a bargain price (ยฃ1 per sheet 8ft x 18″) so I didn’t ask what type of medite it was, I was too busy loading the car ๐Ÿ˜€

    Nah, its no worries really, I’m just moaning for moanings sake ๐Ÿ˜‰ I quite enjoyed trying something different to be honest as I’ve made alot out of foamboard and ally-faced foamboard recently. I’ve started trying out exterior plyboard as well, but learning my lesson, I cut it outside now with a table saw. I was amazed how cheaply I could pick up picture rail-style timber (I’ve been using it for frames/borders) and its made a big difference to the finish on my recent work. Speedwise though, there is alot of work needed to make wood/MDF signs look professionally finished, so I think I still lean towards the plastic/metal materials. Plus I’m getting lazy ๐Ÿ˜ณ

    You know the paint you get in spray cans, the type used for touching up cars, what is that classed as? I know its paint ๐Ÿ˜€ , but whenever I try spraying metal panels, it seems to take forever to cover and it rubs off when I’m manhandling the panel round the workshop ๐Ÿ˜•

    Cheers, Dewi

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 9:58 pm

    Thanks Steve

    Found the products you were on about

    Going to give this a shot

    Cheers

    Dewi: Watch out for the MDF
    Always wear a mask
    As Steve said it is carcinogenic

    John

  • J. Hulme

    Member
    August 21, 2004 at 10:21 pm

    And it’s about time cheap and nasty MDF was banned by the HSE.
    Never, ever, use this rubbish.
    Unless you enjoy the prospect of a premature death through lung cancer of course.

    Urea / Phenol Formaldehyde, excellent stuff for a long and fulfilling career in manufacturing…if you do want to saw / cut / use it to save a couple of quid…well..Rather your lungs than mine

    Dewi, stick to the cigarettes at least you have a warning on the packet informing you that it will expire your existance somewhat a little short ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Whatever you do… don’t smoke MDF…oh no…..(<(
    it tastes rotten.

  • Andy Gorman

    Member
    August 22, 2004 at 12:20 am

    Perhaps when people start dropping like flies, someone will sue whoever makes that Changing Rooms toss. Bloody MDF everywhere.

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    August 22, 2004 at 9:21 am

    this is an old post i made a while back on mdf…

    I met a cousin I havenโ€™t seen for some time.. Heโ€™s 35 years old and
    Works as a joiner. A good one at that..
    Anyway, as soon as I walked closer to him I instantly noticed his eyes were in a bad way. Puffy, very red & raw looking & watering slightly. Looked like someone that had been crying for hours..
    I asked him what was up, he went onto tell me that 6 months ago he was building
    A cabinet for a house he was working in. the cabinet was made from MDF.
    He had just cut a shelf for it as was rubbing it down with some fine sand paper.
    He slid the shelf into place, glanced to check it was fitting each side and noticed the sawdust sitting on it.. He gave it a quick blow! In doing so the dust blow back into his eyes. After a quick rub etc he felt it only getting worse. He went and got his medical kit and used some eyewash he had.. It did not work. He went home & tried some more.. Still did not work. So proceeded to the hospital.
    At the hospital they tried all the usual stuff for this type of thing but nothing was working. They gave him a cream to help stop the burning, but said it should sort its self over the next 48hours. 48hrs passes and still the exact same.. Since then he has tried about 30 different creams, liquids, eye drops.. Specialists from around the country, but nothing has worked.
    The doctors are now saying that they cannot remove the dust because it is so fine.
    Because itโ€™s taking so long to actually get anything done it seems to only damaging his eyes more. In short.. He has now been forced to retire from ever working again.
    They reckon if it doesnโ€™t improve he may have to have the aid of a white stick.. and possible complete blindness. They also say that his case is not the only oneโ€ฆ there has been many others.
    When I go back into work next week I will be putting a large notice on the walls
    Stating that goggles must be used when working with MDF at all times.
    I think if your company uses this often at work it would be advisable to put some kind of notice up, just incase you could be held liable if something like this happens to your staff.

    ive obviously missed use breathing gear too ๐Ÿ˜• looks like it has similar health hazards as the 2 pac paint

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 22, 2004 at 9:47 pm

    I remember this post well Rob

    Very sad indeed

    But just another reminder to be careful and wear the appropriate stuff

    John

  • Steve Broughton

    Member
    August 23, 2004 at 8:11 am

    Almost all things in a workshop can and will screw up your health IF you don’t take notice of warnings on the packaging/safety data sheets (now we all have safety data sheets handy just in case HSE want to visit don’t we???) all it takes is a little care and common dog MDF is safet to use IF you go to Wikes and buy a 2 quid dust mask and wear the ‘kin thing, I worked in the printing trade for 15 years and we used some really nasty chemicals but in that time I never had an accident because I used them responsibly and with care, for instance one of the plate etch chemicals I used was pretty dangerous, if it was burnt it gave off phosgene gas ever heard of it? it was what the nazis used in the gas chambers, another chemical had a flash point of 25oC one lad found this out when he left half a container on the desk by a window on a nice warm summers day (remember them???) oooh it did make a mess or John will remember signwriters paint with lead in it and some older signwriters still complain that lead paint was better didn’t they mind that lead poisoning made you crackers hmm hold on know I know why Johns puns are so awful :lol1: :lol1: ๐Ÿ˜‰ just use a little common dog and you’ll be fine.

  • John Singh

    Member
    August 23, 2004 at 8:44 pm

    Yeah! I still have a few pots of old one shot with lead in it.
    I think they may have taken out the lead in the new stuff.

    I remember years ago I would wash my hands in white spirits to get the lead paint off – absolutely crazy. ๐Ÿ™„

    Oh! and when I was younger i managed to swallow a record needle but
    …I’m alright, I’m alright, I’m alright, I’m alright *hair* *hair*

    John

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