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  • Vinyl for applying to Vinyl flooring, is there such a product?

     Barry Williams updated 4 months ago 7 Members · 16 Posts
  • Iain George

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 12:21 pm

    We have been asked to lay out some markings onto a vinyled floor by our client. Now normally the floors are painted and the marked lines are also painted ( photo 1) but our client has decided, in their wisdom, to now re lay all of the demostation floors with vinyl flooring and needs theses markings replaced. Normal vinyl I am guessing would last about a week on the floor and any specialist floor vinyl would need printing and laminating at big cost for such a small amount being used. I have tried to use specailst floor marking tape but as it stretches when pulled from the roll it never seems to go down straight.
    I am thinking that a tape dispenser may help with a starighter line, is there a vinyl alternative or even paint?

    Thanks in advance.

    Iain


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  • Martyn Heath

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 1:05 pm

    Personally would use a standard polymeric film. I think it would last fine in my opinion

  • Iain George

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 3:54 pm
    quote John Lacey:

    Looks like a heavy industrial area – iwould use paint as a first option…

    The guys who do the shop refits for my client have said that it can’t be painted, as they are the ones who usually paint the floors and then the markings. As the client has asked for vinyl flooring so the shop fitters have passed the floor marking onto me. If you think it can be painted then why are the shop fitters not doing it?

  • Iain George

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 5:25 pm

    It is not a concrete floor, it is a vinyl floor that is the point. My original post and subject line say it is for a vinyl floor. The vinyl flooring cannot be painted.

  • Phill Fenton

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 5:26 pm

    Rob’s bruv (Jim Lambie) is an artist who uses vinyl to create stunning visuals on floors with great success. So I don’t see why ordinary vinyls can’t be used to mark out floors in this way


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  • Iain George

    Member
    February 15, 2020 at 5:33 pm
    quote Phill Fenton:

    Rob’s Bruv Jim Lambie is an artist who uses vinyl to create stunning visuals on floors with great success so I don’t see why ordinary vinyls can’t be used to marke out floors in this way

    I am not sure if normal signage vinyl would stand up to the foot fall, that is why I am asking for alternatives.
    The vinyl floor is laid by the shop fitters, this used to be just a painted concrete floor but the company’s specifications have changed, and I have been asked to provide the single line floor markings to mark out the room sizes for storage.
    If people think an off the shelf signage vinyl like M7 or and equivalent would work I will go with it but I thought that floor vinyl had a higher grab and was slightly thicker and was only available as printable not as colours.
    I am happy to be told otherwise.

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 5:59 am
    quote Phill Fenton:

    Rob’s bruv (Jim Lambie) is an artist who uses vinyl to create stunning visuals on floors with great success. So I don’t see why ordinary vinyls can’t be used to mark out floors in this way

    Phill’s correct…
    If the floor itself is a type of vinyl flooring, then you will not have a problem if you apply a decent brand of Polymeric Vinyl.

    The vinyl itself is tough when laid properly. By that I mean you must:

    * Sweep the floor
    * Wash the area which will be getting the lines.
    * Let it dry 100% (this can be sped up with a heat gun)
    * Apply the vinyl lines and if the floor is cold or the bond doesn’t feel just right, warm it over with a heat gun once it has been laid.

    Vinyl is not paint, it is not going to take the likes of a forklift truck wheel spinning around on-top of it, but it will easily handle people walking over it.

    You don’t want to apply long lengths of the vinyl or you will get twists in it and it will stick to itself.
    You do not want to tug on it, but lay it relaxed and it will not stretch.
    Cut the lines up the width of a 4ft wide roll. i.e. 48inches.

    If you are struggling to prevent stretching of the vinyl then apply an application tape on top and apply. But this shouldn’t be necessary once you get the knack of it.

    The following video is just a few of 60+ vinyl floor installations we have done for my brother Jim over the past 15 years, around the world.
    You will see the last one in Mexico had white vinyl laid first. this was just for easy removal of all the individual cut lines of vinyl and to make sure no residue was left behind. So a water-based adhesive on white vinyl was laid first. (Gallery was very specific)

    The vinyl we use varies depending on the floor type and stipulations of some Galleries but the majority is Oracal 751c or Oracal 551

    Not all, but the majority of these are installed on cold polished cement, marble or varnished wooden floors.
    This MASSIVE floor shown below was installed by us in Glasgow GOMA Gallery and in the 3 months it was down, it had a footfall of around 280,000 people in to see it and walk over it.
    I am not saying damage does not occur, it does. but obviously minimal or this type of work my brother does would not be possible and in many cases, installed permanently in places all over the world.


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  • Iain George

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 8:55 am

    Thanks Robert for that information and how you and your brother do such fantastic floors. I can tell you straight away that my client will not want the lines to be made up of shorter lengths. I may just go with longer lengths but also use application tape to keep them from twisting.

  • David Stevenson

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 9:31 am

    Wow!!! I’m actually lost for words Robert! That’s an incredible bit of work. Wouldn’t have liked to have been paying the bill for getting those fitted, can’t imagine the amount of man hours that would have taken both in preparation then fitting.

    Do you think Iain you could sell the shorter strip idea on the basis that if it gets damaged you could leave them some spare strips that they could replace themselves rather than having the expense of bringing you back?

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 6:13 pm

    .

    Thanks, David.

    quote Iain George:

    Thanks Robert for that information and how you and your brother do such fantastic floors. I can tell you straight away that my client will not want the lines to be made up of shorter lengths. I may just go with longer lengths but also use application tape to keep them from twisting.

    the shorter lines just make the application easier, but you can cut them at any length.
    we cut them that length because although we made all the floor kits, in most cases they were shipped to other countries for my brother’s staff or even art students helping to install. keep in mind these lines vary from 5mm up to 60mm wide so become very flimsy and delicate to handle continually while kneeling on a hard floor. (use knee-pads, makes so much difference)

    if you are taping the lines up, try to make sure you have an exposed edge of the vinyl so you can have something to line-up with.
    also, mark the floor with a straight edge and a pencil. do not use a wax pencil unless you are definitely not going to apply over it. the wax will act as a repellent to the adhesive on the rear of the vinyl stripes and will come away or chip.

  • John Hughes

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 6:18 pm

    Just get the vinyl in slit down to 100mm ? width x 10 metre rolls. And then a roll of standard masking tape to stiffen up while applying.

    John

  • Iain George

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 6:20 pm

    The lines are 50mm wide so app tape . I was thinking of use if a chalk line to mark out.

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 11:04 pm
    quote John Hughes:

    Just get the vinyl in slit down to 100mm ? width x 10 metre rolls. And then a roll of standard masking tape to stiffen up while applying.

    John

    we trialled this route many years ago. it’s hopeless because the 20m – 50m roll just unwinds itself while sitting on the floor as you work your way along because unlike the likes of sellotape, it is not sticking to itself to hold the roll in one until you pull some out.

    then applying application tape would take a while trying to align the 50mm stripes.
    you could, laminate a roll of application tape over the roll of vinyl and then have it slit down to 50mm strips/rolls. but your back to the unwinding of the roll while your working.

  • Robert Lambie

    Member
    February 16, 2020 at 11:48 pm
    quote Iain George:

    The lines are 50mm wide so app tape . I was thinking of use if a chalk line to mark out.

    chalk-lines are good in theory mate, I have tried them many times in the past on trucks, vans and even floors. the problem you will have is the dust from the line is very faint either side of the actual chalk line left and attaches itself to the vinyl as you apply. again, meaning that the edge has not stuck down properly to the floor.
    it may be an idea to try laying some 50mm masking tape where you want the line to be and butt-join the vinyl to that, then lift the masking.

  • Barry Williams

    Member
    February 17, 2020 at 11:34 am

    If the client would accept painted markings why not use an etch primer first and then follow up with the chosen paint colour.
    (An etch primer on the vinyl would provide a "key").
    Barry

  • Barry Williams

    Member
    June 22, 2020 at 12:16 pm

    Browsing the forum—-how did this project finish?
    Barry

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